[Blackstudies-l] Spring courses in Africana/ Black Stuies

Emilye Crosby crosby at geneseo.edu
Thu Oct 11 14:08:49 EDT 2012


Dear Africana/ Black Studies community,

I will send out a full list of courses for the Africana Studies minor and the Black Studies major soon. Meanwhile, I want to draw your attention to two BLKS specific courses (they work for both the minor and major). They are listed here and there are fuller descriptions below.

1. Blks288: Neo-Slave Narrative, taught by Maria Lima (3 credits) T/R: 11:30-12:45 in Welles 119. 

2. Blks288/ Hist288: Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Ella Baker, taught by Emilye Crosby (4 credits) T/R, 2:30-3:45 and T 4-6:30 lab, in Sturges 108. [Note: this is a 4-credit experimental courses with a film and speaker lab component, see description below.]

Students interested in the minor or major, or in need of advising, should see Emilye Crosby, Blake C, office 9. My office hours are T: 8:45-9:45, T: 11:30-12:30, and Th: 1:15-2:15, or by appt. You can also email me: crosby at geneseo.edu.

1. Blks288: Neo-Slave Narrative, taught by Maria Lima (3 credits) T/R: 11:30-12:45 in Welles 119
Since the last decades of the twentieth century, writers across the African Diaspora have attempted to recover elements of the narrative structure and thematic configuration of slave narratives.  The main reasons for this seemingly widespread desire to rewrite a genre that officially lost its usefulness with the abolition of slavery are the will to re-affirm the historical value of the original slave narrative and to reclaim the humanity of the enslaved by (re)imagining their subjectivity.  While most colonial testimonies of slavery have long disappeared from the working memory of today’s Black Atlantic societies, the prejudices and stereotypes they conveyed unfortunately have not.
 
Initial Reading List:
Octavia Butler's Kindred (1979)

Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose (1986)

Fred D'Aguiar's The Longest Memory (1994)

Valerie Mason-John’s Borrowed Body (2005)

Andrea Levy’s The Long Song (2010)


2. Blks288/ Hist288: Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Ella Baker, taught by Emilye Crosby (4 credits) T/R, 2:30-3:45 and T 4-6:30 lab, in Sturges 108.

This is a 4-credit experimental class that will combine historical study and reading with extensive use of film, documentary, music, and analysis of popular culture/ current events. We will focus on three of the most important and best known "leaders" of the Civil Rights/ Black Freedom Movement, in terms of their historical role, how they are viewed and represented today, and how their work and views might inform our understanding of contemporary issues. 

We will meet for "regular" class on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:30-3:45 and have a 2 1/2 hour lab on Tuesdays, immediately following our regular class (with a 15 min. break). The Tuesday lab will be used almost exclusively for watching movies and documentaries, with some occasional guest speakers and library "lab" work, focused on finding and watching/ "reading" (which applies to film and musical sources as well as print media) popular culture and historical sources. Guest speakers will address both the history and the contemporary issues and students will have the option of completing a service learning assignment instead of a traditional final paper. 

Please let me know if you have any questions. You can reach me at crosby at geneseo.edu. The course description is below.

Emilye Crosby

Course description.   This course will use biographical study of Martin Luther King Jr. Malcolm X, and Ella Baker as a way to study the modern Civil Rights Movement and to analyze contemporary historical representations of the movement and society. We will draw on memoir, biography, speeches, interviews, movies, documentaries, and popular culture to explore many topics, from the high profile debates over "nonviolence and self-defense" and "integration v. nationalism" to the competing ideas, strategies, and leadership styles within the larger black freedom struggle, the impact of gender, the implications of historical distortions, and connections to contemporary issues. This is a 4-credit course that will meet three hours a week for regular class discussions with an additional “lab” period (which will be used primarily to view films, but also to meet with a few guest speakers).

T/R: 2:30-3:45 (class)
T: 4-6:30 (film lab)


Emilye Crosby
Professor
History Department
1 College Circle
Geneseo, NY 14454
(585) 245-5375
crosby at geneseo.edu

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