<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Emancipation at 150<br><br><br>Panel discussion: Friday, February 1, in Newton 214, 3:00-4:30 p.m.<br><br>Panelist: Justin Behrend, Cathy Adams, Rose-Marie Chierici, and Alice <br>Rutkowski<br><br>Meditations on Emancipation (in the 21^st century)<br><br>Exhibition opening reception: Friday, February 1, Lederer Gallery in <br>Brodie Hall, 5-7 p.m.<br><br>Artists: Keven Atoms, Aileen Bassis, Patrick Earl Hammie, Andrew <br>Jackson, Liliya Krys, So Soon Lym, Steven McCarthy, Stephen Marc, and <br>Eto Otitgobe<br><br>January 1, 2013, marks the 150^th anniversary of the Emancipation <br>Proclamation and there is an underlying tension with this <br>anniversary.Assistant Professor Justin Behrend in the history department <br>and the Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery director have organized a panel, <br>?Emancipation at 150? and an exhibition ?Meditations on Emancipation (in <br>the 21^st century)? to highlight this important historical moment.<br><br>Racial disparities and social inequalities still persist in the fabric <br>of American life.And yet we live in a moment that many believe is a <br>post-racial.Many ask how the country can be post-racial if there hasn?t <br>been a meaningful discussion across racial lines about the historical <br>legacy of race in America.<br><br>We have invited panelists and artists to have a conversation on the <br>meaning of emancipation and it?s ramifications as a physical, <br>intellectual and spiritual state. Confronting the history and memory of <br>slavery must lead us all to pose questions and seek possible answers <br>that elucidate our personal and public thoughts and positions on <br>emancipation, freedom, America, equality and social justice.<br><br><div apple-content-edited="true"> <span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div><div><div><div><div>Emilye Crosby</div><div>Professor</div><div>History Department</div><div>1 College Circle</div><div>Geneseo, NY 14454</div><div>(585) 245-5375 (office phone)</div><div><a href="mailto:crosby@geneseo.edu">crosby@geneseo.edu</a></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></span></div></span> </div><br></body></html>