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<div class="m_-5963245411923093135preheader" style="font-size:1px;display:none!important">One of the most powerful and beloved voices of all time passes away in Detroit.</div>

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        <span style="font-size:19px"><b>Aretha Franklin Was America's Truest Voice </b></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:transparent;min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-bottom:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a052d07aee3e554970aebcad724459cfddda2991693ecf9ea507d4cda9db47d11f50cc86133e983653e4a9e94a8ef1153" title="" target="_blank"><img src="https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/08/13/gettyimages_52702185_wide-ef06130c1ee6cfb2e6f95c0abcdcbf3046888f47-s600-c85.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin sings in the studio during during her early career at Columbia Records." width="600" style="display:block;height:auto;width:100%;padding:0px;text-align:center" height="auto"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-top:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><div style="text-align:right">
        <span style="font-size:11px"><span style="color:#696969"><i>Frank Driggs Collection/Getty Images</i></span></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner">Aretha Franklin, the "Queen of Soul," died Thursday in Detroit after battling pancreatic cancer. She was 76. Franklin sold more than 75 million records during her life, making her one of the best-selling artists of all time. She took soul to a new level and inspired generations of singers who came after her. <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03ac35b3ea402b42e2af878b47202029590f5826eb3c31065eed7bb7994e2b78fea430620faef93f0c41046243264588f2a" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">Read more</a> from <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a4f175c25b19871513cb90a9b56477916382af2eaed86cf7e62f9ee6a15b537c9e10f6c02e351949fa02726718b9c92bf" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">NPR’s Ted Robbins</a>.<br>
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 </td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><b style="font-size:19px;text-align:center">An Appreciation Of The Music Icon</b></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:transparent;min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-bottom:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a17e3ed2617a1fc207d18b2cd5d00300befb141fe2392f958d40f459dcdb28054ec3eb9ba25676dd56273c5f8d255e435" title="" target="_blank"><img src="https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/08/13/gettyimages-454018429_wide-95d51f5471bf924ccffca894bc0bd338327a03a3-s600-c85.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin performs at the national Christmas tree lighting ceremony in Washington, D.C., in 2013. " width="600" style="display:block;height:auto;width:100%;padding:0px;text-align:center" height="auto"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-top:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><div style="text-align:right">
        <span style="color:#696969"><span style="font-size:11px"><i>Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images</i></span></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03ab5b8f6de0ac322f810d12817578d692de607901baeaf9406e7573d38db8c21046219b5246664aeeac6f914835f6bd5c5" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">NPR’S Ann Powers </a>remembers Franklin's voice as the voice of America. No other contemporary artist embodied the nation's brash optimism with as much flair, nor exemplified its sorrow-forged resilience as convincingly. No one better expressed American joy. Her murmurs gave shape to a sensuality that defeated repressive moral codes and replaced them with the commandments of tenderness, of sweet bitter love. Her high notes made hope happen. When she sang, we remembered that we could walk on the moon. <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03ab032c084cdf9c8500282de7bb8de2612bd571aeb9a805a7dcaa0483ea8cd69c89a60093e316aa0e242c567625f364566" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">Read more</a>.<br>
 </td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="m_-5963245411923093135socialshare-wrapper" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" align="center"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><table class="m_-5963245411923093135socialshare-innertable" style="display:inline-block"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:5px 10px"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a84a0339f81ba680ec161b341c1a87396a827b4f1e6c3a405499e487b02dbb9d553750534b3e1f3d213de674e18e95f80" target="_blank"><img src="https://image.s4.exct.net/lib/fe911573736c007d7d/m/2/e76b988d-8feb-4d15-b8d9-1ccf4bee17cd.png" alt="Facebook" width="24" height="24" style="display:block;width:24px!important;height:24px!important"></a></td></tr></tbody></table><table class="m_-5963245411923093135socialshare-innertable" style="display:inline-block"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:5px 10px"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03acd8daed17e11b7bc2f4e6ea3a42ed9f8484878accc5a1b0e1e5f61d10780f8f60ba26953dfa996c0f9cc3f474756ab56" target="_blank"><img src="https://image.s4.exct.net/lib/fe911573736c007d7d/m/2/f071eec4-5672-4190-b5c4-03c64fd3f5bd.png" alt="Twitter" width="24" height="24" style="display:block;width:24px!important;height:24px!important"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><br>
<b style="font-size:19px;text-align:center">The Fresh Air Interview</b></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:transparent;min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-bottom:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03acd7ac2c1bdbdbc835d98e759453c602e8f48724092209193b81881a9dffe34fc509d8f23617ffcd4de7b14a6d9acb005" title="" target="_blank"><img src="https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2017/02/14/gettyimages-2661202_wide-f847f9301ef7bf20d5e3420bd5d623ab29a9dd04-s600-c85.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin poses for the cameras in 1968." width="600" style="display:block;height:auto;width:100%;padding:0px;text-align:center" height="auto"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-top:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><div style="text-align:right">
        <span style="font-size:11px"><span style="color:#696969"><i>Express Newspapers/Getty Images</i></span></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner">The Queen of Soul rarely gave interviews, so we were delighted when she sat down for a Fresh Air interview in 1999. Franklin spoke about her father's gospel influence, growing up with Sam Cooke, crossing over to pop music and more. <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a80898f838ed160f787a9cae0911cb3cb59b57ab1dcade75478bd7862a9da28a41dd71d0c2fb335cf45594767ec713fd8" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">Read Franklin's edited conversation</a> with <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03ac76b49bd052abb83da52f15d10960518abd13c3aea7c162c260a4054b8f474ca136816dd4d3220abdda757e652dd9f93" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">NPR's Terry Gross</a>.<br>
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 </td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><b style="font-size:19px;text-align:center">Aretha Franklin: The Essentials </b></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:transparent;min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-bottom:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a8aa5ab5c4152f66bd66ebbdac4e7536879b6a06bccdedf5c6c82b06620e24069b4e7d9f373d2a829ba6a31657ddbceb1" title="" target="_blank"><img src="https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2017/07/05/gettyimages-2637601_wide-00d379d4bb600dca294e588c3a29be83db4e61a1-s600-c85.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin poses for a portrait in 1967." width="600" style="display:block;height:auto;width:100%;padding:0px;text-align:center" height="auto"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-top:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><div style="text-align:right">
        <span style="color:#696969"><span style="font-size:11px"><i>Express Newspapers/Getty Images</i></span></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner">Explore beyond Franklin's namesake hits like "Respect" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" to appreciate Franklin's monumental highlights with <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a21a13a9e18b65483c0df0ea863f479c2eb6fe00d60f284100ba6cd6951be66534051fb007bb90298d1de5813849c7dba" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">NPR Music's In Memoriam playlist</a>.<br>
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 </td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><b style="font-size:19px;text-align:center">Aretha Franklin: The Deep Cuts</b></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:transparent;min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-bottom:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03aef6a96628474583f7dc9e2f6ce8e76351eaf4a1694ce7896b86bbf9259de7c272aabe0fb157375fe1aaf8a91d68cdf18" title="" target="_blank"><img src="https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/08/14/aretha-franklin-1967-portrait-billboard-1548_wide-7b46b436ab53a0d4f7493b35c53070e80a135ae4-s600-c85.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin poses for a portrait in 1967." width="600" style="display:block;height:auto;width:100%;padding:0px;text-align:center" height="auto"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-top:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><div style="text-align:right">
        <span style="font-size:11px"><span style="color:#696969"><i>Atlantic Records</i></span></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner">Though the Detroit-raised powerhouse is known for chart-topping hits like "Respect," "Think" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman," true fans know there's just as much beauty in the Aretha songs with a few less spins in the jukebox. NPR Music staff members recall their favorite <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03aa5f982853f8b9b2db49e97a12fdbe1b257f1c3124b46acbc55d14c5308437fcb551c52f744aca5d5084c4b2b14cd8830" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">Aretha Franklin deep cuts</a> — from the lesser-known B-sides of the 1960s to the unexpected dance music collaborations of the '80s. <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03aff85f97453fe56c7a7d3e61b9096bd7d627712d5f529e817bf3a03d7099bb1f14bad6a2b4b70990833db687ce99654ed" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">Read more</a>.<br>
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            <tbody><tr><td><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135slot-styling"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px 15px 10px" class="m_-5963245411923093135slot-styling m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><b style="font-size:19px;text-align:center">Aretha's Feminist Anthem</b></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:transparent;min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0px" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-bottom:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03a638f361a030b1fa9746ac70933b98b405fb17e5f23b764fa25c39fb310fb3e7beb090fb9977b8ab8de8337b4a81d2cb1" title="" target="_blank"><img src="https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/08/13/gettyimages-103124737_wide-c24257579541668dc48d0838763ef681c04a457a-s600-c85.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin performs with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mann Center for Performing Arts in 2010." width="600" style="display:block;height:auto;width:100%;padding:0px;text-align:center" height="auto"></a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width:100%"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" class="m_-5963245411923093135responsive-td" style="width:100%;padding-top:3px"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner"><div style="text-align:right">
        <span style="font-size:11px"><span style="color:#696969"><i>Jeff Fusco/Getty Images</i></span></span></div></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="min-width:100%" class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper"><tbody><tr><td class="m_-5963245411923093135stylingblock-content-wrapper m_-5963245411923093135camarker-inner">No one saw it coming, but the song Aretha Franklin laid down on Valentine's Day 1967 would go on to become one of the greatest recordings of all time. <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03af009ab38e0ca160e495b17460fe3b40f3cb11dea4041b8e125ac7edfff3252fdbf682d09c1d509236c178e92e3ae4153" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">"Respect"</a> hit the top of the charts four months later and turned Aretha Franklin into a feminist champion. The song became a transformative moment — not only in her career but also in the women's rights movement and the civil rights movement. <a href="http://click.et.npr.org/?qs=8e630604d852e03ad59083dc3953fbb6162f6dea0851d0da4e44a4087f2afebafc50f84ba1bb7598d7fe99662e958e97a65b98fce51bb2e4" style="color:#4e84c4;text-decoration:underline" title="" target="_blank">Read more</a>.<br>
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